rambleon

Ramble On by Sinclair McKay
This fascinating ramble through the history of walking delves into our relationship with the British countryside. Ramble On tells the story of how country walks were transformed from a small and often illegal pastime to the most popular recreational activity in the country. Perfectly capturing the sense of exhilaration on reaching the summit of a blustery hill-top path.

 

holloway

Holloway by Robert Macfarlane & Dan Richards
In July 2005, Robert Macfarlane and Roger Deakin travelled to explore the holloways of South Dorset’s sandstone. They found their way into a landscape of shadows, spectres & great strangeness. Six years later, after Deakin’s early death, Macfarlane returned to the holloway with the artist Stanley Donwood and writer Dan Richards. The book is about those journeys and that landscape.

 

deerisland

Deer Island by Neil Ansell
In spare and beautiful prose Neil Ansell overlaps two contrasting journeys through the streets of London and the wilds of Jura, building a powerful and moving meditation on what it means to belong. What makes us feel attached to a place or a community? What do we mean when we call a place home? Are memories the only things we can ever truly own?

 

pondlife

Pondlife by Al Avarez
An athlete in his youth, Alvarez, now in his eighties, chronicles what it is to grow old with humour and fierce honesty – from his relentlessly nagging ankle which makes daily life a struggle to infuriating bureaucratic battles with the council to keep his disabled person’s Blue Badge, the devastating effects of a stroke, and the salvation he finds in the three Ss Swimming, Sex and Sleep.

 

Untitled-2

The Sea Inside by Philip Hoare
Philip Hoare sets out to rediscover the sea, its islands, birds and beasts. He begins on the south coast where he grew up, a place of almost monastic escape. From there he travels to the other side of the world – the Azores, Sri Lanka, New Zealand – in search of encounters with animals and people. Navigating between human and natural history, he asks what these stories mean for us now.

 

siltroad

Silt Road by Charles Rangeley-Wilson
At the foot of a chalk hill a stream rises in a silent copse, and is soon lost under the car parks and streets of the town its waters once gave life to. Captivated by the fate of this forgotten stream Charles Rangeley-Wilson sets out one winter’s day to uncover its story.